Refining the Personal Vision Statement

NaBloPoMo 2020 – Today’s Lesson

“I, Cathy Cheng, living and working at my highest and best, am Honest, Curious, Generous, Humble, and Kind, so that I can cultivate the best possible relationships with and between all people.”

How does this statement land?  On me, not on you.  Well, maybe a little on you—is this how you experience me at my highest and best?  The personal vision statement is just that—personal.  It’s my own beacon to navigate life’s storms.  But what good is it if it’s only for me?  Shouldn’t it also be the light I emanate  to make my best contributions in this one brief existence? 

Thanks to Braver Angels pal Sharon Kristjanson and her Engaging With Difference class, I have protected time these two months to spelunk this inner work.  Sweet!  Though I have had a Why statement for a while, it’s high time to test and refine it.  How does it hold up when relationships get really hard?  What does it mean to be honest all the time?  To be generous and humble when I’m tempted not to?  What is the shadow side of curiosity?

It’s deep work, but not necessarily heavy. I’m not drafting a final life mantra for my headstone. I’m noodling with a saying that fits at the same time like my most comfy pajama pants and my most flattering black dress. I am my own best seamstress, taking in and letting out as my relational habitus changes over time and experience. I’m always me, with evolving roles, tasks, and projects. Playing lightly and lovingly with words, purpose, and meaning, in whatever context surrounds me, with a trusty journal and smooth-writing pen…this is an ideal weeknight! Adaptive. Resourceful. Connected. Possibility. Oh yeah, this is gonna be awesome.

2 thoughts on “Refining the Personal Vision Statement

  1. I love this. In our fight for equality, only looking at the pain on one side, the underdog, we miss seeing how damaging it is to our men, our boys, to unfairly be given so much more. The massive price of privilege. If we could help men see they were also being injured by these inequities perhaps more men may be able to join us in our quest.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Melissa! I wonder if you meant this as a comment on the Men’s Health and Misogyny post? The “price of privilege” concept may seem at fist like an oxymoron, especially for people who lack a certain privilege… and really it’s another paradox–counterintuitive and real nonetheless… and also just one part of the whole story. *sigh* so many layers of complexity… ;P

      Like

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