Culture of Medicine, Part II

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NaBloPoMo 2018:  What I’m Learning

So, what did you think of how trainees described the Culture of Medicine?  If you’re in medicine, how much did you resonate?  If you’re not in medicine, how much were you surprised, or not?  How do you think this affects our relationships with you, our patients?

Do you wonder how we get through any given day?

I asked the group:  What are characteristics or traits of Culture of Wellness (COW) Leaders?  Once again, I present their responses here, in order of discussion.

  1. “They ask how people are doing.” They are proactive about it, opening the door, making it safe to talk honestly about how we really are doing.  They exhibit the ‘body language of listening.’  It’s still hard to talk about it, one student pointed out.  The best leaders explicitly carve out time to talk, to invite feedback.  It also matters what they do with the information once they get it—empathizing and acting on it if needed, rather than dismissing.
  2. Mentor. This is someone who knows you and whose role it is to help you ‘unconditionally,’ different from any of your evaluators—maybe an advisor.  It can be an informal relationship, maybe just someone you want to emulate.  Trainees agreed that it often happens organically, and they seek it actively.  One resident identified her program director as ‘absolutely a COW leader.’
  3. Walk the Talk. Examples: work/life balance/integration, acceptance of mistakes, admitting when you don’t know something.  NO DEFLECTING; OWN YOUR SHIT.  This one hit home with me—this is Integrity.  As Brené Brown says, integrity is “choosing what’s right instead of what’s fun, fast, or easy.  It is living your values rather than simply professing them.”

The next several descriptors emerged in a flurry.  The atmosphere in the room swelled with positive energy as one label after another of what we admire about our teachers and colleagues overtook the downtrodden mood just moments before:

  • Consistency
  • Proactivity
  • Openness
  • Empathy
  • Personally engaged
  • Curiosity
  • Caring
  • Kindness
  • Vulnerability—willing to share
  • Positivity—seeing mistakes as learning opportunities. Encouraging—“We’ got this!”
  • (Understand the importance of) Food: attending to physical needs
  • Humor—acknowledging the challenge and weight of the work and also holding it loosely
  • Validating
  • Appreciative
  • Grateful

The last one triggered a story.  One student rotated on an inpatient service.  Critically ill patients poured into the hospital; all work hour restrictions were necessarily violated.  Nerves were more than frayed, and people were at their worst.  He witnessed open hostility by senior residents toward interns, backstabbing, undermining.  The attending, present only minimally, was oblivious.  And, “They never said thank you.”  The student, who had planned to enter this field, considered switching.  It was that bad.  But somehow, he was able to get perspective and remind himself that this one bad experience did not represent the whole of this specialty.  It had been an unusually busy month at the end of a long, hard year.  Maybe the cumulative exposure to some of his COWL role model traits had rubbed off, and buoyed him when he stepped onto a leaky boat.

A senior student admitted that when she started medical school she had heard of burnout.  “I initially didn’t believe it could happen to me…  Then later I realized it can happen to anybody—it could absolutely be me, if I don’t take care of myself.”  I asked what that means, taking care of yourself?  They answered:

  • Sleep
  • Nutrition: “Any food your intern year; choices matter more when you’re PGY (post graduate year) 3!”
  • Outside interests
  • Finding a practice situation that fits: eg caring for the underserved, women’s health, hospital medicine, etc.
  • Find Your Tribe. The trainees did not use these words, but this is what I wrote in my notes—they expressed a need for belonging.
  • People at work: truly collegial relationships, especially across specialties
  • Confidants: safe people to share with, your emotional support network
  • Physician-Patient relationships: mutually vulnerable and open

I asked them what they needed to take care of themselves.

  1. Purpose
  2. Time—to be given by the system, and also to be responsible and efficient with themselves.
  3. Habits—established and also adaptible

Overall the discussion felt productive and successful in the end.  We had just mapped out the way(s) to Be The Change we seek in our profession.  Some of them took pictures of my notes (so Millennial), which made me feel gratifyingly connected.  I had tried to question more than lecture, to explore and facilitate more than ‘teach.’  I wanted each of them to own their own path to leading from any chair, now and forever.  I proposed that they could start the moment they walked out of the conference room door—no elevated status or title necessary.

This is why the calling still resounds compellingly, why our enthusiasm for the work persists resolutely, despite the hardships.  It’s Hope.  And at its foundation lies the bedrock of our best relationships—with ourselves, with one another, and with our patients.  On the march toward a true Culture of Wellness, real leaders go in front and set the example.  The rest of us learn by mimicking.  Thus we all have leadership potential and, dare I say, responsibility.  We are the system; we make the culture—each and every one of us makes a unique contribution.  Nothing we do is too small to matter.

Onward.

Because This Is Who We Are

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Followers of this blog may know of my interest in and passion for physician health and well-being.  I was immersed in this world the last couple of months, with two amazing conferences and multiple conversations with fellow physicians at work.  As often happens, I was moved to articulate a vision/mission statement of sorts, mostly to solidify my own intentions and also to share with like-minded colleagues.

I love that I enter this arena from the world of executive health.  Corporate leaders, physician leaders, and physicians on the ground share so many attributes that everything I learn from patients translates seamlessly to my own professional development.  This is exactly the right space for me to inhabit today, and I am forever grateful for the integrative experience.  Physicians are care team leaders by default, and we miss opportunities to improve all of medicine when we forget or ignore this fact.  I’m interested to know your response to the words below—the more visceral the better (but please, if possible, refrain from spitting, vomiting, or defecating your own words here):

Why do we advocate for physician health and well-being? 

Because we believe we can only lead well when we are well ourselves.

Because leading can be lonely and leaders need support.

Because leaders need metrics of our own performance, both related to and independent of the performance of those whom we lead.

Because health and leadership intersect inevitably and who we are is how we lead; the more awareness and active, intentional self-management we practice, the more effective leaders we will be.

Because people follow our example, like it or not, so we owe it to ourselves and those we lead to model Whole Physician Health.

What Is Whole Physician Health?

Whole Physician Health is an approach to health and well-being which defines physician as both clinician and leader, both healer and vulnerable.  This approach focuses on the 5 Realms of Health: Nutrition, Exercise, Sleep, Stress, and Relationships.  We explore how these realms intersect and overlap, affecting the individual physician, those whom the physician cares for and leads, and the entire medical profession.  We apply principles from health and sports psychology, communication, leadership, mind-body medicine, and myriad other disciplines.  We value openness, curiosity, critical analysis, and collaboration.  Our mission is to create a resilient medical culture in which all members—physicians, patients, all caregivers and support personnel—thrive and flourish.

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The Whole Physician Health Advocate:

*Values self-awareness and self-exploration.

*Understands and accepts his/her position as role model and culture setter for the team.

*Wishes to broaden the skillset in cultivating positive relationships

  • With self
  • Between self and immediate colleagues
  • Between colleagues themselves
  • Between physicians and staff
  • Between teachers and learners
  • With extended family of colleagues and institutional entities
  • Between institution and the patients it serves

*Sees the physician health and well-being movement as an opportunity to learn, see from a different point of view, connect to fellow physicians, and form new tribal bonds that will hold us all up.

*Wants to contribute to the creation of a global professional vision and mission of the 4 WINS:

WIN 1–You

WIN 2–Those you lead

WIN 3–Your whole organization

WIN 4–All those whom your organization touches

Of note, one need not be a physician to advocate for Whole Physician Health.