What I’m Learning

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NaBloPoMo 2018

 

ACK!  It starts!

As usual, I have a whole list of ideas for the daily posts this month, and I will likely use none of them.  Who knows, right?  The goal is to practice daily writing and publishing, and do my best to make it non-drivel.

2018 has turned out to be a thick, challenging, and tumultuous year, among other things—would you agree?  What have you learned?  What lessons continue to revisit you?  Is it not all just so fascinating?  What would you write about if you had to publish something every day for 30 days straight…  And try not to bore people to tears every time?

For now, I will start with the books I’m hearing (because I don’t read books as much as I listen to them these days).  So many gifted writers out there, so many ideas—and they all connect in my experience, stimulating insight, understanding, humility, and inspiration.  I’ll list the books here that I’ve ‘read’ this year, and then bring in articles, presentations, etc. the rest of the month—things that have meant something to me personally or professionally—often largely overlapping circles of a Venn diagram.

I predict that the overarching themes will center around self-awareness, integrity, leadership, and relationship (surprise).  We shall see!  As I described to my friend tonight, this will be a practice in discipline, vulnerability, and brevity.  So here goes!  I list the books of 2018 below, in roughly the order that I consumed them.   Starting tomorrow, I will start pulling central tenets and key learnings, exploring how they apply to personal experiences in the every day.  Or maybe I’ll ditch this idea and do something totally different, tomorrow, next week, or whatever.  That’s the beauty of writing every day, I can just go wherever it takes me.

And so the journey begins again (continues!)—thanks for coming along!

ONWARD.

Braving the Wilderness by Brené Brown

A Day in the Life of Marlon Bundo by Marlon Bundo and Jill Twiss

The Righteous Mind by Jonathan Haidt

Big Potential by Shawn Achor

Switch by Dan Heath and Chip Heath

Originals by Adam Grant

Never Split the Difference by Chris Voss

Better Than Before by Gretchen Rubin

The Will Power Instinct by Kelly McGonigal

Mindset by Carol Dweck

The Big Sort by Bill Bishop

Do the Work by Steven Pressfield

How Stella Saved the Farm by Vijay Govindarajan, Chris Trimble

The Art of Possibility by Rosamund Stone Zander and Benjamin Zander

Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert

Dare to Lead by Brené Brown

Born A Crime by Trevor Noah

Leadership and Self-Deception: Getting Out of the Box by the Arbinger Institute

A Year of Living Kindly (still reading) by Donna Cameron

On Journeying Together

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NaBloPoMo 2016, Letters to Patients, Day 30

To Patients Who Journey With Me:

It is my privilege and my honor.

Well here we are, my friends, we made it!  30 posts in 30 days, woooo hoooooooooo!!

I had 30 topics all lined up on Halloween, and I think I used 6 of them.  How fascinating!  Looking back, I’m pretty proud of the content this month.  It all came from places of true feeling and contemplation, and I tried my best to make it relevant to the physician-patient relationship.  I meant to write more cogently about policy and operations, maybe illuminate more of the physician’s experience, to help patients understand our perspectives.  I wonder if that is more appropriate for long form writing, or even not writing at all, more like panel discussion or podcast?

Some of you have followed, liked, and commented all the way through—thank you so much.  After all, what is a blog if nobody reads it?  The feedback has held me up and kept me going.  It’s not so different from my relationships with actual patients.  Some are superficial and short-lived.  But most have a true human connection, and potential for integrative growth over time.  My heart is warmed whenever you inquire about my children with genuine caring.  When you remember my extracurricular projects and congratulate my successes, I feel respected.  Heck when you just notice that my hair is longer, I know you see me!

Believe me, I’m not in this just for the science, or the money, or the prestige, or the teaching.  I’m in this to know you, my patient—and for you to know me.  I know there are some who see me as expendable, exchangeable.  Their interactions with me feel purely transactional.  And that’s okay; everybody needs something different.  But I could not long survive a practice of only such relationships.  No, that would kill my soul for sure.  I live for the connections, I say.  I learn from every one of you, and you make me better.

So thank you for journeying with me.  It’s a long, strange trip, eh?  The path winds, the weather shifts, and times change.  But as long as we go together, I’m all in.

 

On You, the Elite Athlete

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NaBloPoMo 2016, Letters to Patients, Day 28

To All Patients:

What would happen if you thought of yourself as an elite athlete?

I present tonight the first phase of the presentations I have given this fall to physicians, corporate executives, and tomorrow, a corporate design team.  See how it applies to you:

***

What makes you exactly the same as Pat Summit, Martina Navratilova, Michael Jordan, Dana Torres, Peyton Manning, Serena Williams, Wayne Gretzky, and Walter Payton?  You are an elite athlete.  You have a specific skill set which you spent years training and honing.  You continue, through practice and discipline, to refine it.  It’s an upward striving, just like an Olympian—Higher, Faster, Stronger!  And, you’re part of a team.

So how should you take care of yourself—your very valuable, elite athlete self?

Fuel & Train

  • “Regular people diet and exercise. Athletes fuel and train.” –Melissa Orth-Fray
  • Our bodies are our vehicles. Elite athletes’ vehicles require premium fuel and meticulous maintenance.
  • We all struggle with the same challenges—time, motivation, discipline.
  • Each day we have an opportunity to walk the talk, and practice what we preach. Every good lifestyle choice, no matter how small (apple instead of candy, stand rather than sit), is a step of intention toward health.

Rest & Recover

  • Chronic sleep debt increases risks for diabetes, obesity, impaired immune function: GET MORE SLEEP.
  • Rest and recovery are integral for sustaining long term performance and injury prevention—ie burnout. This applies for both physical and mental exertion.
  • Take your allotted vacations and really disconnect.  The world will still function (temporarily) without you.
  • Broaden your methods: 15 minute walk, 10 minute meditation, 5 minutes of journaling—unwind, unload.

Manage your stress

  • How do you know when you are ‘stressed?’ How/where does stress manifest in your body?
  • What are your existing resilience practices? How quickly do you abandon them when things get busy?
  • Exercise mindfulness: Live in the moment; breathe deeply; speak and act intentionally, not incidentally.
  • We are no different from toddlers—easily emotionally hijacked when tired, hungry, over-extended.
  • Elite athletes use the disciplines above to manage their emotions and stay focused.

Cultivate positive relationships

  • Coaches, teammates, trainers, psychologists, equipment managers—no athlete succeeds alone.
  • We thrive when we feel seen, heard, understood, accepted, loved, and safe.
  • It is only when our relationships are strong and we feel connected, that we can truly care for ourselves and our teams.
  • Who is your support network, and how do they hold you up?
  • Who do you support, and why/how does this fulfill you?

 

What is your sport?  Who is your team?  How does caring for yourself benefit those around you?  And finally, what can you do today, tomorrow, next week, next month, and in the next year, that will elevate your own health and well-being, and that of your team?  Please share your ideas in the comments!